HANCOCK

This London firm was founded in 1849 by Charles Frederick Hancock (b. 1807 in Birmingham). C.F. Hancock, a previous partner in the firm of Hunt & Roskell, opened his own shop at 39 Bruton Street obtaining soon after a Royal Warrant of Appointment from Queen Victoria (advertising as 'successors of Storr & Mortimer').
The firm had a manufactory workshop (closed in 1897) adjoining his premises in Little Bruton Street and retailed jewellery and silver manufactured by silversmiths as Robert Hennel & Sons, Hayne & Cater, C.T & G. Fox and others.
After the partial retirement of C.F Hancock (1866), the firm continued its activity as Hancock, Son & Co. The partners were Mortimer Hancock (son of C.F. Hancock), Horatio Stewart and Henry John Dore. After the definitive retirement of C.F. Hancock (1870) the firm's name changed to Hancocks & Co and Charles Frederick Hancock junior (son of C.F. Hancock) entered in the partnership (1870-1876).
Mortimer Hancock retired in 1883 and Horatio Stewart in 1885. Henry John Dore continued as sole partner until his death in 1895 when he was replaced by his widow Louisa Mary Dore (1895-1904) and his sons Henry Hancock Dore (1898-1914) and Alfred George Dore (1899-1914).
The firm moved in 1917 to 25 Sackville Street converting in 1936 to a limited liability company under the style Hancocks & Co (Jewellers) Ltd.

The firm exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851 with a display of magnificent silverware and later appeared in Paris in 1867 and Vienna in 1873. In Vienna, Hancocks were awarded

This London firm was founded in 1849 by Charles Frederick Hancock (b. 1807 in Birmingham). C.F. Hancock, a previous partner in the firm of Hunt & Roskell, opened his own shop at 39 Bruton Street obtaining soon after a Royal Warrant of Appointment from Queen Victoria (advertising as 'successors of Storr & Mortimer').
The firm had a manufactory workshop (closed in 1897) adjoining his premises in Little Bruton Street and retailed jewellery and silver manufactured by silversmiths as Robert Hennel & Sons, Hayne & Cater, C.T & G. Fox and others.
After the partial retirement of C.F Hancock (1866), the firm continued its activity as Hancock, Son & Co. The partners were Mortimer Hancock (son of C.F. Hancock), Horatio Stewart and Henry John Dore. After the definitive retirement of C.F. Hancock (1870) the firm's name changed to Hancocks & Co and Charles Frederick Hancock junior (son of C.F. Hancock) entered in the partnership (1870-1876).
Mortimer Hancock retired in 1883 and Horatio Stewart in 1885. Henry John Dore continued as sole partner until his death in 1895 when he was replaced by his widow Louisa Mary Dore (1895-1904) and his sons Henry Hancock Dore (1898-1914) and Alfred George Dore (1899-1914).
The firm moved in 1917 to 25 Sackville Street converting in 1936 to a limited liability company under the style Hancocks & Co (Jewellers) Ltd.

The firm exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851 with a display of magnificent silverware and later appeared in Paris in 1867 and Vienna in 1873. In Vienna, Hancocks were awarded

the Emperors' gold medal for Science and Art in addition to the 'Prize Medal'. As a consequence of their reputation as makers of exquisite pieces in 1856, Hancock was granted the prestigious award of designing and producing the Victoria Cross which is still made by the company today.

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