A FIVE SECTION ORMOLU AND CUT-GLASS SÛRTOUT DE TABLE CIRCA 1820, ATTRIBUTED TO KLINCKERFUSS AND MÜNCH

A FIVE SECTION ORMOLU AND CUT-GLASS SÛRTOUT DE TABLE CIRCA 1820, ATTRIBUTED TO KLINCKERFUSS AND MÜNCH

Of rectangular form with rounded ends, glazed plates and pierced sides decorated with diamond cut-crystal and ormolu medallions between anthemion flower holders, medallions and frieze finely cast in relief with paterae, the double gryphon feet below a breakfront frieze cast in relief with trophies, one of the sections with a label underneath explaining in hand written French how to handle the sûrtout.      

135 inches (343cm) long
27 3/4 inches (70.5cm) wide
5 3/4 inches (14.6cm) high

The Württemberg Court style was strongly influenced by the ‘goût Empire‘ which under Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte from circa 1800 onwards, became the official state style. The main inventors and major proponents of this style were the neoclassical French architect, interior decorator and designer Charles Percier (1764-1838) in close partnership with his friend Pierre François Léonard Fontaine (1762-1853). As most of the main artists and workshops were based in Paris many things for the Württemberg court were directly ordered there and usually only from the best producers such as Pierre-Philippe Thomire (1751 – 1843). Furthermore the Württemberg Court also employed its own artists who developed and promoted the local version of the Empire style; such as the German architect and painter Nikolaus Friedrich von Thouret (1767-1845), who was court (mainly interior) architect to King Friedrich I von Württemberg and Johannes Klinkerfuss who was court furniture maker to King Wilhelm. As the Württemberg Court of course also needed many special commissions it may be assumed that on various occasions the local artists produced designs which were then probably executed in Paris.

The elaborate use of the ormolu and cut crystal medallions can be found – although in a much more restrained fashion – on some Russian, German and French Empire chandeliers but seems to be unique for a sûrtout. This was probably made on special demand from the Württemberg court to match the other ormolu and crystal table decorations and therefore most likely attributable to Johann Klinckerfuss.

Johannes Klinkerfuss (1770 - 1831) was born outside of Frankfurt. He received his early training in cabinetmaking from his father Philippe (d.1798). In 1789 Klinkerfuss continued his education as an ébéniste when he went to work for the David Roentgen’s factory in Neuwied. David Roentgen (1743- 1807), a master ébéniste in the guild of Parisian cabinetmakers, served as the appointed cabinetmaker to Marie-Antoinette. Impressed with Klinkerfuss’ talents as both a cabinet-maker and furniture designer, Roentgen planned to install Klinkerfuss as the director of his forthcoming factory branch in St. Petersburg; however, the War of Coalitions in 1792 prevented the branch from opening. Roentgen introduced Klinkerfuss to Duchess Dorothee Sophie of Württemberg (1736-1798), who became a valued patron. The Duchess moved to Stuttgart in 1795 when her husband Duke Friedrich II Eugen became regent of Württemberg. In 1799 Klinkerfuss was appointed the royal Kabinettebenist and often collaborated with Casimir Münch, who was Hofciseleur at the Court of Stuttgart. In 1812 Klinkerfuss left his position at court to open his own manufactory in Stuttgart, yet he continued to design furniture for members of royal family until his death in 1831.

 

Price : On application